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Reverse proxy Standard Requirements
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Reverse proxy Standard Requirements ab 85.49 € als Taschenbuch: . Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Taschenbücher, Wirtschaft & Soziales,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 30.05.2020
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User Stories Applied
34,99 € *
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Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application. Product Description Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with "user stories": simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other "proxies" Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. Features + Benefits Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. ° A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements ° Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community ° Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins Backcover Agile requirements: discovering what your users really want. With this book, you will learn to: Flexible, quick and practical requirements that work Save time and develop better software that meets users' needs Gathering user stories -- even when you can't talk to users How user stories work, and how they differ from use cases, scenarios, and traditional requirements Leveraging user stories as part of planning, scheduling, estimating, and testing Ideal for Extreme Programming, Scrum, or any other agile methodology ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with user stories: simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other proxies Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. ADDISON-WESLEY PROFESSIONAL Boston, MA 02116 www.awprofessional.com ISBN: 0-321-20568-5 Foreword. Acknowledgments. Introduction. I: GETTING STARTED. 1: An Overview. What Is a User Story? Where Are the Details? "How Long Does It Have to Be?" The Customer Team. What Will the Process Be Like? Planning Releases and Iterations. What Are Acceptance Tests? Why Change? Summary. Questions. 2: Writing Stories. Independent. Negotiable. Valuable to Purchasers or Users. Estimatable. Small. Testable. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 3: User Role Modeling. User Roles. Role Modeling Steps. Two Additional Techniques. What If I Have On-Site Users? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 4: Gathering Stories. Elicitation and Capture Should Be Illicit. A Little Is Enough, or Is It? Techniques. User Interviews. Questionnaires. Observation. Story-Writing Workshops. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 5: Working with User Proxies. The Users' Manager. A Development Manager. Salespersons. Domain Experts. The Marketing Group. Former Users. Customers. Trainers and Technical Support. Business or Systems Analysts. What to Do When Working with a User Proxy. Can You Do It Yourself? Constituting the Customer Team. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 6: Acceptance Testing User Stories. Write Tests Before Coding. The Customer Specifies the Tests. Testing Is Part of the Process. How Many Tests Are Too Many? The Framework for Integrated Test. Types of Testing. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 7: Guidelines for Good Stories. Start with Goal Stories. Slice the Cake. Write Closed Stories. Put Constraints on Cards. Size the Story to the Horizon. Keep the UI Out as Long as Possible. Some Things Aren't Stories. Include User Roles in the Stories. Write for One User. Write in Active Voice. Customer Writes. Don't Number Story Cards. Don't Forget the Purpose. Summary. Questions. II: ESTIMATING AND PLANNING. 8: Estimating User Stories. Story Points. Estimate as a Team. Estimating. Triangulate. Using Story Points. What If We Pair Program? Some Reminders. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 9: Planning a Release. When Do We Want the Release? What Would You Like in It? Prioritizing the Stories. Mixed Priorities. Risky Stories. Prioritizing Infrastructural Needs. Selecting an Iteration Length. From Story Points to Expected Duration. The Initial Velocity. Creating the Release Plan. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 10: Planning an Iteration. Iteration Planning Overview. Discussing the Stories. Disaggregating into Tasks. Accepting Responsibility. Estimate and Confirm. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 11: Measuring and Monitoring Velocity. Measuring Velocity. Planned and Actual Velocity. Iteration Burndown Charts. Burndown Charts During an Iteration. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. III: FREQUENTLY DISCUSSED TOPICS. 12: What Stories Are Not. User Stories Aren't IEEE 830. User Stories Are Not Use Cases. User Stories Aren't Scenarios. Summary. Questions. 13: Why User Stories? Verbal Communication. User Stories Are Comprehensible. User Stories Are the Right Size for Planning. User Stories Work for Iterative Development. Stories Encourage Deferring Detail. Stories Support Opportunistic Development. User Stories Encourage Participatory Design. Stories Build Up Tacit Knowledge. Why Not Stories? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 14: A Catalog of Story Smells. Stories Are Too Small. Interdependent Stories. Goldplating. Too Many Details. Including User Interface Detail Too Soon. Thinking Too Far Ahead. Splitting Too Many Stories. Customer Has Trouble Prioritizing. Customer Won't Write and Prioritize the Stories. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 15: Using Stories with Scrum. Scrum Is Iterative and Incremental. The Basics of Scrum. The Scrum Team. The Product Backlog. The Sprint Planning Meeting. The Sprint Review Meeting. The Daily Scrum Meeting. Adding Stories to Scrum. A Case Study. Summary. Questions. 16: Additional Topics. Handling NonFunctional Requirements. Paper or Software? User Stories and the User Interface. Retaining the Stories. Stories for Bugs. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. IV: AN EXAMPLE. 17: The User Roles. The Project. Identifying the Customer. Identifying Some Initial Roles. Consolidating and Narrowing. Role Modeling. Adding Personas. 18: The Stories. Stories for Teresa. Stories for Captain Ron. Stories for a Novice Sailor. Stories for a Non-Sailing Gift Buyer. Stories for a Report Viewer. Some Administration Stories. Wrapping Up. 19: Estimating the Stories. The First Story. Advanced Search. Rating and Reviewing. Accounts. Finishing the Estimates. All the Estimates. 20: The Release Plan. Estimating Velocity. Prioritizing the Stories. The Finished Release Plan. 21: The Acceptance Tests.The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 30.05.2020
Zum Angebot
User Stories Applied
34,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application. Product Description Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with "user stories": simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other "proxies" Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. Features + Benefits Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. ° A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements ° Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community ° Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins Backcover Agile requirements: discovering what your users really want. With this book, you will learn to: Flexible, quick and practical requirements that work Save time and develop better software that meets users' needs Gathering user stories -- even when you can't talk to users How user stories work, and how they differ from use cases, scenarios, and traditional requirements Leveraging user stories as part of planning, scheduling, estimating, and testing Ideal for Extreme Programming, Scrum, or any other agile methodology ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with user stories: simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other proxies Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. ADDISON-WESLEY PROFESSIONAL Boston, MA 02116 www.awprofessional.com ISBN: 0-321-20568-5 Foreword. Acknowledgments. Introduction. I: GETTING STARTED. 1: An Overview. What Is a User Story? Where Are the Details? "How Long Does It Have to Be?" The Customer Team. What Will the Process Be Like? Planning Releases and Iterations. What Are Acceptance Tests? Why Change? Summary. Questions. 2: Writing Stories. Independent. Negotiable. Valuable to Purchasers or Users. Estimatable. Small. Testable. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 3: User Role Modeling. User Roles. Role Modeling Steps. Two Additional Techniques. What If I Have On-Site Users? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 4: Gathering Stories. Elicitation and Capture Should Be Illicit. A Little Is Enough, or Is It? Techniques. User Interviews. Questionnaires. Observation. Story-Writing Workshops. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 5: Working with User Proxies. The Users' Manager. A Development Manager. Salespersons. Domain Experts. The Marketing Group. Former Users. Customers. Trainers and Technical Support. Business or Systems Analysts. What to Do When Working with a User Proxy. Can You Do It Yourself? Constituting the Customer Team. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 6: Acceptance Testing User Stories. Write Tests Before Coding. The Customer Specifies the Tests. Testing Is Part of the Process. How Many Tests Are Too Many? The Framework for Integrated Test. Types of Testing. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 7: Guidelines for Good Stories. Start with Goal Stories. Slice the Cake. Write Closed Stories. Put Constraints on Cards. Size the Story to the Horizon. Keep the UI Out as Long as Possible. Some Things Aren't Stories. Include User Roles in the Stories. Write for One User. Write in Active Voice. Customer Writes. Don't Number Story Cards. Don't Forget the Purpose. Summary. Questions. II: ESTIMATING AND PLANNING. 8: Estimating User Stories. Story Points. Estimate as a Team. Estimating. Triangulate. Using Story Points. What If We Pair Program? Some Reminders. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 9: Planning a Release. When Do We Want the Release? What Would You Like in It? Prioritizing the Stories. Mixed Priorities. Risky Stories. Prioritizing Infrastructural Needs. Selecting an Iteration Length. From Story Points to Expected Duration. The Initial Velocity. Creating the Release Plan. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 10: Planning an Iteration. Iteration Planning Overview. Discussing the Stories. Disaggregating into Tasks. Accepting Responsibility. Estimate and Confirm. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 11: Measuring and Monitoring Velocity. Measuring Velocity. Planned and Actual Velocity. Iteration Burndown Charts. Burndown Charts During an Iteration. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. III: FREQUENTLY DISCUSSED TOPICS. 12: What Stories Are Not. User Stories Aren't IEEE 830. User Stories Are Not Use Cases. User Stories Aren't Scenarios. Summary. Questions. 13: Why User Stories? Verbal Communication. User Stories Are Comprehensible. User Stories Are the Right Size for Planning. User Stories Work for Iterative Development. Stories Encourage Deferring Detail. Stories Support Opportunistic Development. User Stories Encourage Participatory Design. Stories Build Up Tacit Knowledge. Why Not Stories? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 14: A Catalog of Story Smells. Stories Are Too Small. Interdependent Stories. Goldplating. Too Many Details. Including User Interface Detail Too Soon. Thinking Too Far Ahead. Splitting Too Many Stories. Customer Has Trouble Prioritizing. Customer Won't Write and Prioritize the Stories. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 15: Using Stories with Scrum. Scrum Is Iterative and Incremental. The Basics of Scrum. The Scrum Team. The Product Backlog. The Sprint Planning Meeting. The Sprint Review Meeting. The Daily Scrum Meeting. Adding Stories to Scrum. A Case Study. Summary. Questions. 16: Additional Topics. Handling NonFunctional Requirements. Paper or Software? User Stories and the User Interface. Retaining the Stories. Stories for Bugs. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. IV: AN EXAMPLE. 17: The User Roles. The Project. Identifying the Customer. Identifying Some Initial Roles. Consolidating and Narrowing. Role Modeling. Adding Personas. 18: The Stories. Stories for Teresa. Stories for Captain Ron. Stories for a Novice Sailor. Stories for a Non-Sailing Gift Buyer. Stories for a Report Viewer. Some Administration Stories. Wrapping Up. 19: Estimating the Stories. The First Story. Advanced Search. Rating and Reviewing. Accounts. Finishing the Estimates. All the Estimates. 20: The Release Plan. Estimating Velocity. Prioritizing the Stories. The Finished Release Plan. 21: The Acceptance Tests.The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 30.05.2020
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Neighbor Discovery Proxy-Gateway
59,00 € *
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6LoWPAN is an adaptation layer that permits the transport of IPv6 packets over low-power IEEE 802.15.4 networks. However, an important protocol tightly coupled to IPv6, Neighbor Discovery, has proven to be unsuitable for IEEE 802.15.4 network links. For this reason, the IETF has defined a number of optimizations to adapt the traditional Neighbor Discovery protocol to non-transitive wireless links. While these optimizations result in a more efficient use of the resources of hosts within 6LoWPAN networks, they introduce a number of impediments for communication between traditional IPv6 nodes and 6LoWPAN nodes. This work describes how to overcome these obstacles by providing the necessary proxy and forwarding mechanisms to integrate 6LoWPAN nodes into existing IPv6 networks. Since the integration method proposed here requires no changes in the network infrastructure nor human intervention, the entire process occurs in a transparent, seamless, and cost-effective manner. In particular, this thesis details the requirements, specification, implementation, and evaluation of an embedded device responsible for such integration: a 6LoWPAN Neighbor Discovery Proxy-Gateway (6LP-GW).

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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An Intelligent Meta-Search Engine With Personal...
49,00 € *
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The volume of documents in Internet are increasing every day . Again, each internet user has different search requirements. There are different approaches for creating user profiles by gathering user information through proxy servers or desktop robots . But both techniques require active participation of the user to install and configure these applications. In this work, we investigated the use of a less-expensive means of gathering user information for personalized or user specific search. Our study explored the effectiveness of personalized search based upon user profiles constructed from user search records. Individual user information such as queries submitted ,results returned and web pages selected from retrieved results were collected to create user profiles. These profiles were then used to re-rank the search results and the rank-order of the user-examined results before and after re-ranking were compared. Our study found that user profiles based on queries were as effective as those based on title and short descriptions. We also found that our personalized re-ranking resulted in an observable improvement in the rank-order of the user-selected results.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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Service Provisioning for Federated Personal Net...
59,00 € *
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In Fednet, there are two approaches for providing the services. One is overlay and the other is proxy-based. Each of the approaches has the advantages and drawbacks. To trade off between these two approaches, we propose a new scheme, which can make the way of service provisioning in Fednet flexible and adaptable to the changing environment and the user s preference. Some modules are designed in the Fednet agent (FA), Fednet manager (FM) and the service proxy to support our new mechanism. To fully illustrate the concept of Fednet and the service provisioning in Fednet, we implement a Fednet prototype. It shows us how the Fednet is formed and how messages are exchanged between the FA and the FM. With the aim of proving our decision making algorithms can make decisions according to the user s requirements and the changing context, some simulations and a real test bed experiment based on one or two parameters are carried out. The simulations results show that our new service provisioning mechanism could make the way of service provisioning flexible and adaptable as we have expected.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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Corporate Governance and Quality of Financial R...
93,90 € *
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This book examines the quality of interim financial reports and the impact of corporate governance on the quality. The quality of interim is proxied by timeliness, compliance with the FRS 134, Interim Financial Reporting, compliance with the Bursa Malaysia Listing Requirements, and comparability of profit and loss items when they were originally issued and placed in the next year's corresponding quarter and comparison against the annual reports. Two methods are used to assess the quality of interim namely dichotomous and continuous. The first method provides one score for each proxy if it is in compliance and zero score otherwise and the latter method use the actual values. Corporate governance is proxied by the frequency of directors' meetings, independence, financial literacy, corporate governance expertise, and the ethnicity of directors. This book has implications for several users such as regulatory bodies to ensure that companies comply with the interim reporting standards, policymakers to ensure there is no misapplication of provision of accounting standards, protect shareholders to appoint appropriate composition of directors, and academicians for future research.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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Application Layer Proxy to Save Energy in Netwo...
59,00 € *
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Information Technology generates about 2% of the global CO2. Network hosts, most of which are idle most of the time, are maintained fully powered-on at all times only for the purpose of maintaining network presence. This book develops general requirements for proxying and is the first exploration of application-level proxying with the intention of saving energy by maintaining network presence. Proxying for TCP connections, SIP, and Gnutella P2P was investigated. Proxying for P2P lead to the exploration of space and time efficient data structures to reduce the computational requirements of keyword search in the proxy. The use of pre-computation and hierarchical structures for reducing the false positive rate of a Bloom filter was explored. Potential energy savings are shown to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars per year assuming a modest adoption rate of the methods investigated in this book. This book is for professionals in Computer Science looking for ways to design and implement ideas to save energy in computer networks.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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Cisco ASA Configuration
61,50 € *
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"Richard Deal's gift of making difficult technology concepts understandable has remained constant. Whether it is presenting to a room of information technology professionals or writing books, Richard's communication skills are unsurpassed. As information technology professionals we are faced with overcoming challenges every day... Cisco ASA Configuration is a great reference and tool for answering our challenges." --From the Foreword by Steve Marcinek (CCIE 7225), Systems Engineer, Cisco SystemsA hands-on guide to implementing Cisco ASAConfigure and maintain a Cisco ASA platform to meet the requirements of your security policy. Cisco ASA Configuration shows you how to control traffic in the corporate network and protect it from internal and external threats. This comprehensive resource covers the latest features available in Cisco ASA version 8.0, and includes detailed examples of complex configurations and troubleshooting. Implement and manage Cisco's powerful, multifunction network adaptive security appliance with help from this definitive guide.Configure Cisco ASA using the command-line interface (CLI) and Adaptive Security Device Manager (ASDM) Control traffic through the appliance with access control lists (ACLs) and object groupsFilter Java, ActiveX, and web content Authenticate and authorize connections using Cut-through Proxy (CTP)Use Modular Policy Framework (MPF) to configure security appliance features Perform protocol and application inspectionEnable IPSec site-to-site and remote access connectionsConfigure WebVPN components for SSL VPN accessImplement advanced features, including the transparent firewall, security contexts, and failoverDetect and prevent network attacks Prepare and manage the AIP-SSM and CSC-SSM cards

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.05.2020
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